Author Topic: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000  (Read 564 times)

Dave84

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Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« on: December 18, 2017, 08:50:09 PM »
Considering getting into reloading. Done some research and this thing if tuned correctly should be able to produce a high volume of 10mm at a reasonable cost. Have any of you used this press? Pros and cons please.

The_Shadow

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2017, 09:39:39 PM »
Even with a single stage press you can churn out a decent amount of ammo.  There are two things to keep in mind cheap is just that!  You want quality ammo invest in quality press and dies.
I still use my single stage press the most because I hand weigh each and every powder charge regardless of the powder.  Match grade loads are what I stride for from the tiny 25ACP, 380's to the big rifle rounds! 

To make things faster, I setup and size and deprime all the brass.  The case mouth expander step for all.  Then hand prime them all.  Then weigh powder and seat a bullet without ant crimp applied for all.  Then I taper crimp without moving the bullet to finish. 

The most important piece of equipment is you scale as you need to understand how it works and its accuracy that you life may depend on.  I like the RCBS 5-10 scale which the bounce is dampened and it has been very accurate since I started loading in 1978... :D
The "10mm" I'm Packin', Has The Bullets Wackin', Smakin' & The Slide is Rackin' & Jackin'!
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tommac919

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2017, 05:54:52 AM »
Considering getting into reloading. Done some research and this thing if tuned correctly should be able to produce a high volume of 10mm at a reasonable cost. Have any of you used this press? Pros and cons please.

Yes, I have one.... It's works well when it works and is a PIA when it doesn't ... don't recommend it to anyone.
It , for me, ended up as a target round loader  as I don't want to touch any setting for fear it will crap up again.

For people starting out, first I recommend a few of the classic loading books,  After that I tell new loader to get a Lee Classic  Turret.
The LCT can be used as a single press if wanted, is easy to change out dies, and works just fine for most startups ( there are sev kits which include some of the extras )

LCT will turn out rounds fast enough while allowing the new loader to keep track of what is going on

http://www.cabelas.com/product/shooting/reloading/reloading-presses-press-kits/pc/104792580/c/104761080/sc/104516280/lee-precision-classic-turret-press-kit/1374275.uts?slotId=3


PS.. yes , get a good scale and check weights along with a micrometer

sqlbullet

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2017, 07:23:59 AM »
For years I wondered about crazy people who would pay the money for a blue progressive reloading machine.  I had RBS and Lee single stage presses, and figured one day I would buy a Hornady LNL AP.  Then three things happened.

First, a friend bought a Pro 1000.  He spends more time tinkering with it than loading ammo.  Like tommac919 says, it works fine when it works.  But more often than not, it doesn't really work.  While he may get 250-300 rounds an hour on a good hour, there are also plenty of hours where very little ammo is loaded as you futz around. 

Second, a different friend stumbled into a Dillon Square Deal B at a garage sales for $75.  It came with 38/357 dies and 44 dies, which is what he loads.  He didn't have room for a loading bench in his home at the time, so he mounted it on my bench and loaded at my place.  Compared to the Pro-1000 it was a dream.  400 rounds an hour day in and day out.  Only think "wrong" with this press is the wonky proprietary dies it uses, and there cost. 

Third, I won an auction and ended up with this in my garage:



These all needed sized, trimmed and swaged.  I tried it single stage and realized I would never live long enough.  The big time consumers were trimming and swaging the primer pockets.  Since my plan was to sell the brass and there was good profit margin, I decided I would splurge on a Dillon Super 1050.  It does on press primer pocket swage and has plenty of stations for the rapid trim to be installed.  I can process about 2000 once fired 7.62 an hour on this beast.

I now have a 10mm kit for my 1050, and it is a dream.  The only hold-up is filling primer tubes.

I can't speak to the Hornady LnL AP.  It may be a fine press.  But for my money I would look to a Dillon 550C as a starting reloading progressive press.  Buy once, cry once.


Dave84

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2017, 07:31:37 AM »
Thanks for the great info and advice. I will pass on the pro 1000.

tommac919

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2017, 10:42:41 AM »
Really do believe for the Dillion you get every penny you paid in value.

My issue is I have 3 presses running now ( pro1000, 2 LCT ) and my round count for the month is , IMO, to low for the cost.
I now shoot maybe a max of 300 rounds a month...

I think the change over to a high end Dillion pays when you shoot more than 400-500 rounds a month... then your starting to exceed the cost vs time ratio  :)


TonyRumore

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2017, 12:18:31 PM »
I bought one when they first came out....I believe around 1991 or so.  I was loading 357 Magnum on it for my LAR Grizzly using H110 powder.  The powder measure would routinely get hung up and fail to dispense a powder charge.  I ended up with a bunch of squib loads.  That was a enough for me.  I got rid of it shortly thereafter.

Tony


sqlbullet

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2017, 12:23:07 PM »
Really do believe for the Dillion you get every penny you paid in value.

My issue is I have 3 presses running now ( pro1000, 2 LCT ) and my round count for the month is , IMO, to low for the cost.
I now shoot maybe a max of 300 rounds a month...

I think the change over to a high end Dillion pays when you shoot more than 400-500 rounds a month... then your starting to exceed the cost vs time ratio  :)

I would agree with this.

Between the stack o brass I pictured and a house full of shooters, I load a good bit of the time.

G_man

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2017, 07:12:46 PM »
I had a pro 1000 for years and, after initial difficulties for a new reloader, it worked well. I shot a lot back then, mostly light loads for indoor ppc league. Then I started having issues, same as others have already mentioned.

I recently picked up a 550. I am now trying to figure out why I didn't upgrade sooner!! There is absolutely no comparison between the two machines. Do whatever it takes and get a Dillon, you will not be disappointed!
Keep your booger hook off the boom switch until you're ready to fire

cgreth

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2017, 05:23:15 PM »
Went from a Lee single stage press to a Lee Classic Turret to a Dillon 650XL.  I shoot (.45 acp, 9mm and 10mm) 800+ rounds a month.

My 25 year Lee single stage broke on the linkages and I found I could get a new LCT for just a little more than a new single stage.

The LCT was a good press, the biggest problem was volume.   I still keep it for experimenting with new bullets or powders.

The 650XL is awesome.   I spot check my powder about every 25 rounds.   So far it has been very consistent.   A tuned 650XL is a joy to use.

That being said, a progressive press - if you are not super careful and paying close attention - can get you in trouble without you even knowing it.   

If you are clearing a jam (9mm with a swaged pocket or .45 acp with a small primer hole) it is very easy to accidentally advance the shell plate and skip a step in the process.

Highly recommend the powder check system to make sure that you don't load a double load of powder or a case with no powder.

Not sure about the Pro 1000, but the LCT did use a lot of plastic parts to load your cartridges.   The primer feeding system was nearly all plastic, the 'gear' and the housing to turn the turret was plastic.   
At one time Lee had a lot of their parts free or at greatly reduced prices.   I stocked up on the gears and the primer feeding thingy.   Mine were always getting worn out.


Bat Rastard

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2017, 08:53:56 PM »
I started with a Lee 1000. The powder charger hung up.
I went to a Dillon 550 25 years ago. I couldn't be happier.
Were I getting started now, I would likely get a Dillon 650 for the 5th station.
My neighbors dog has been telling me some very disturbing things lately. I just ignore him because everybody knows that dog is crazy.

Ethang

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2017, 03:00:19 PM »
Friends don't let friends buy Pro 1000's... I had one... :o

Buy once cry once. Dillon every day of the week and twice on Sunday.

PCFlorida

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2017, 07:07:55 PM »
Friends don't let friends buy Pro 1000's... I had one... :o

Buy once cry once. Dillon every day of the week and twice on Sunday.

True. Used a SDB for 20+ years and had no complaints. Bought a used 650XL 10 years ago from a friend of a friend (I think of you often Phil, God bless) and sold the SDB with all the dies for close to what the 650XL cost me. And it just keeps on going, like the Energizer bunny. Awesome press.
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Dave84

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #13 on: December 26, 2017, 11:33:42 AM »
I ended up getting the lee classic turret press. Sounds like it's the middle of the road and abgood way to get started.

cgreth

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Re: Thinking of buying a Lee Pro 1000
« Reply #14 on: December 26, 2017, 07:22:50 PM »
Make sure that you get the carbide pistol dies.   Not sure if they make those and the plain steel ones - used to be two kinds.   you definitely want the carbide ones.

Also strongly suggest the lee bulge buster kit - for anyone using any press that takes standard sized dies.   It uses the body of the Lee crimp (????) die to allow you to make sure that none of your cases are out of spec.   Do this after you clean your cases prior to reloading.   I bought the die it needs when i bought the bulge buster kit.   I HATE readjusting dies if I don't have to... :)   I have both the Lee system and the RCBS version.  I prefer the lee.   Seems more positive while pushing thru.   They both work well, I just prefer the feel of the Lee system.

I clean the cases.
Fill half a gallon freezer ziploc bag with cleaned brass.   Give it a several squirts of Hornady case lube.  Seal the bag and shake well.   All the cases get a thin even coating of lube.   Then empty out the cases on paper towels and allow to dry.
Makes going thru the bulge buster and the reloading dies a breeze.   I follow this process for my 9mm's - they really need this since they are a tapered cartridge and my .45 acp's.   Everything just runs smoother and takes a lot less effort when resizing the cases.

Things for the LCT.

The rubber tubing for the spent primers kept missing my bucket.   I ended up getting a baby food jar and drilling a hole in the lid the same size as the OD of the tube.   I then inserted the tube in the lid pushed it in around 3 inches.  wrapped a rubber band tightly around the tube that was inserted - about 1 inch from the end, pulled the lid down on top of the rubber band and then screwed the lid back on the jar.   It worked perfectly and I never had to chase spent primers ever again.   I've done basically the same thing with my after market spent primer tube for the Dillon 650.

I bought the strong mount from inline fabrications.   Worked very well and raised my press about 9 inches off the table.   If your table is taller, maybe you don't need this one.   I was hunching over mine before getting the strong mount.
Ergo reloading handle from inline fabrications.    After an hour or two using the wooden ball on the stock Lee handle I would tend to end up with blisters or hot spots on my hand.   The ergo handle is free spinning and really does feel better.   I did use the stock handle for years and years.   Once I found the ergo handle I never looked back.

Lee adjustable charge bar for the auto disk powder charging system.   This beats switching out the disks for different powder measures.   Mount the auto disk powder system on your tool head (will need a powder spacer).   

Get a couple of these from Lee - Square Ratchet.   SKU: TF3567   they are fifty cents each.   Manually spinning your turret with the gear in the wrong place will break it in a heart beat, or it will just plain wear out after several several thousand rounds.   Better to have one when you need it than to not have one when you need it.

Good Luck with the LCT!