Author Topic: Cross section of a smiley  (Read 18580 times)

DM1906

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2015, 11:27:22 PM »
YDM1906 ; you are right sorry about the late reply I've been tied up but I re-read the instructions  and yes it does say mouth first.

No problem. I'm more interested in folks getting it right than being right. It was curious, though. Lee doensn't change much in their design over time. They usually just release new products and phase out the old. One thing I can say about them is, new repair parts fit old components. I've been using many of their products for over 30 years, and recently had to refurbish an old press. New parts fit perfect.
Life's tough. It's tougher if you're stupid. -- The Duke

halfglocked

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #46 on: August 29, 2015, 07:57:46 PM »
 that's really good to know ,I hate when you buy something and when you order replacement  parts they don't fit because they have been upgraded or "improved " and then you have to end tossing the original and change completely  to the new design which a couple years down the road will be redesigned again.

az1955

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #47 on: August 31, 2015, 06:22:15 AM »
Great info! OP, thanks for posting.

Boksburger

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #48 on: March 09, 2016, 08:15:49 PM »
Very interesting info..thank you for sharing. .the way I see it ..it's easier to replace brass than fingers..why take the chance..I had a blow out from loading extra hot rounds and it wasn't fun

RJM52

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #49 on: September 26, 2016, 05:38:53 AM »
When I first bought a Glock 40 and a RIA Combat Commander I was running some factory Underwood 140 grain Xtreme Penetrator ammo through the two guns. They were clocking well up into the 1600s. The SMILES on the Glock brass looked like the web was about to fail.  The ones from the RAI were very small as it has a supported chamber.

As these round were going much faster than Underwood advertises I contacted them and they sent a shipping label for its return and sent me some new ammo. In the meantime I discovered that the used Glock 40 I had purchased had aftermarket Ghost parts...  I contacted the original owner who sent me the original factory springs and connector. After putting them in the problems all disappeared.

Apparently the reduced poundage striker spring was letting the slide unlock faster that the stock spring and as a result the pressure had not dropped causing the bulged case webs. I have since added a Lone Wolf stainless recoil spring assembly and the gun shoots smoother than with the stock plastic unit...

Underwood ammo...







Glock compared to RIA..




Being a 37 year .38 Super shooter I am used to bulged brass.  Lee makes a .38 Super die that takes all the bulge out so all my brass now will go completely into a Wilson gauge...


I am wondering how many Glock shooters who are blowing cases have had reduced power striker springs in their guns... 

Bob

sqlbullet

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #50 on: September 26, 2016, 06:51:55 AM »
Yeah...Those are bulged beyond recovery.  The metal is definitely sheared, and while you can size them back into shape, the weakness will always be there.

The_Shadow

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #51 on: September 26, 2016, 07:56:52 AM »
Bob writes;
Quote
Apparently the reduced poundage striker spring was letting the slide unlock faster that the stock spring and as a result the pressure had not dropped causing the bulged case webs.

I don't think the striker spring has any effect on the early unlocking of the slide.  The recoil spring and the pressure applied does make some effect to early unlocking.  I actually measured the difference of the factory captured RSA and the Wolff non captive RSA setup I use.

See this Link; http://10mm-firearms.com/gunsmithing/wolff-gun-springs/msg27955/#msg27955
The "10mm" I'm Packin', Has The Bullets Wackin', Smakin' & The Slide is Rackin' & Jackin'!
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Mike_Fontenot

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #52 on: September 26, 2016, 08:07:06 AM »
I've looked for a force gauge that measures a PUSH instead of a PULL, but without any luck.  Such a gauge would make it easy to measure the force required to start the slide moving rearward, and it would be helpful in monitoring the current strength (and possible weakening) of the recoil spring.  I was surprised to learn a year or so ago that just because the rest-length of the recoil spring quits shortening after a while, that doesn't mean that the spring isn't continuing to get weaker.

The_Shadow

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Re: Cross section of a smiley
« Reply #53 on: September 26, 2016, 08:56:41 AM »
My setup was sort of crude, I used a Berkley digital fish scale and a small "C" clamp padded but clamped on the rear of the slide for each test.  Taking the scale and pulling rearward taking readings as soon as the slide started to move from lock and again at the point  the slide started to lock back.

The fish scale was not the best thing but it was workable with repeatable measurements as many were taken and needed to verify results.  If I would have placed the frame in a jig or fixture, like clamping a block of wood (the size of a magazine) in a vise and sliding the gun over it to secure it it would have made for faster and better measurements.

Pulling as straight as possible to the rear is what would yield the results without added stresses.
The "10mm" I'm Packin', Has The Bullets Wackin', Smakin' & The Slide is Rackin' & Jackin'!
NRA Life Member
Southeast, LoUiSiAna