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Messages - sqlbullet

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1
10mm semi-auto handguns / Re: Upgraded my SR1911 this week
« on: January 18, 2018, 10:31:18 AM »
In a properly set up "series 70" 1911 the sear spring is a big part of pull weight above about 4 lbs.  Going lighter makes a big difference.

2
General Discussion / Re: CC 1911 double stack long slide?
« on: January 18, 2018, 10:26:51 AM »
I came here to say what Patriot said.  I would get the Uncle Mikes and remove some stitches from it, then put some stop stitches in to keep it from coming completely un-done.

3
Reloading 10mm ammo / Re: Question on aftermarket G20 barrel usage
« on: January 17, 2018, 12:13:02 PM »
Could be.

Shoot a couple and check the barrel for leading...

4
Reloading 10mm ammo / Re: Question on aftermarket G20 barrel usage
« on: January 17, 2018, 06:53:48 AM »
Personally I use the factory barrel, even for cast.

IMHO...The issue with Glock barrels and cast bullets has little to do with the polygonal rifling, and everything to do with the fact that they are very over-size, and not just the chamber.

Cast bullets lead barrels most commonly not because of velocity, but because they don't fit well enough to seal the bore.  If they don't seal the bore, hot gas (plasma) passes around the bullet and melts the sides. 

Think of a plasma cutter.  If you don't direct and contain a plasma cutters gas through the channel you are cutting, but instead raise the nozzle and let it play across the steel, it does little.  Same with a cast bullet.  Hot gases against the very large base do little, but put the same hot gas and pressure through a small gap on one side of the bullet and it will melt the lead.  Copper allows more blow by, but with a melting point 3X to 4X as high as the lead alloys used for cast bullets, it is not affected.

For this reason we say to size the cast bullet .001" over actual bore diameter.  Unfortunately, most people interpret this as .001" over nominal bore diameter, don't check their barrel, buy .401" bullets and shoot them.

Both my Glocks, an early 29 and a Gen3SF 20, slug at .402".  That means no commercial cast bullets are anywhere near big enough.  Shoot a .401" cast bullet through a .402" barrel and you will get severe leading, no matter how the barrel was made.

I cast my own.  My molds drop bullets that are .403. I don't size them, just lube and I use a good lube.

Lately I have been powder coating bullets, in which case I do size them since the powder coat adds about .002" to the as-case diameter.  In this case I size them back to .403 in a Lee push through die I honed out from .401" to .403".

The real challenge comes for those guys that have barrels a bit looser than mine.  .403" is about as large a bullet as I can make work in 10mm.  Any larger and the case bulges where the bullet seats resulting in reliability issues.  In those cases an aftermarket barrel is the ticket.

To answer you actual question....If I had an aftermarket barrel, I would just shoot that barrel.  I would not switch back and forth.  And, I may one day invest in such a barrel.  The tighter bore results in slightly more velocity and often in better accuracy, as well as the ability to use more "off the shelf" components.

6
10mm semi-auto handguns / Re: Sig Nightmare fastback carry
« on: January 15, 2018, 03:30:16 PM »
That is awesome to know.  My CCO project will benefit from that a great deal!

7
10mm semi-auto handguns / Re: Sig Nightmare fastback carry
« on: January 15, 2018, 08:50:45 AM »
If it is an officers spring I think you can just stick with the original.  I have never found an extra power officers mainspring.  The spring column is just too short to accommodate thicker wire.


Edit - If you do find one, post it up as I want one too.

8
Factory 10mm ammo / Re: JAG head stamp case failures...
« on: January 15, 2018, 08:47:27 AM »
Jag is generally considered to be high quality brass.  I am curious about the mfg as well.

9
10mm semi-auto handguns / Re: Dan Wesson Valor 10mm
« on: January 15, 2018, 08:45:00 AM »
The 1911 was designed at the behest of the US army as a "going in harms way" firearm.  It was over-engineered like all mil-spec products.  Further, it was not designed by "whiz kids" out to revolutionize both small arms design and cost model.

The one issue the 1911 frame had when adapted to the 10mm was an inconsequential crack that developed in some models in the rail above the slide stop access hole.  Colt offered a fix that clearly speaks to the overall strength of the frame.  They just stopped putting rail there.  You can't crack what isn't there!



Typically there are recoil spring changes associated with different calibers.  Each manufacturer kinda does their own thing here, but in general they tend to follow the standards established by Colt:

38 Super/9mm:  14 lb recoil spring
40/10mm:  19 lb recoil spring
45 ACP:  16 lb recoil spring

The breech face has to be cut for the rim/head of the cartridge, and the extractor is a bit different on 38/9/40/10 than on 45.  Again, this is to accommodate a different rim circumference.

But other than required dimensional changes and a small change to recoil spring strength, nothing is done by most companies to tune for the 1911.

Now, to the more important question of what should be done?

Well, there are plenty of 10mm 1911's out there that run just fine with only a 19 lb recoil spring.  There are also lots of opinions about other changes.

I don't really favor jacking up recoil springs myself.  Look at the little tiny feet on the bottom of a 1911 barrel that are responsible for stopping the slide from flying forward off the frame.  Seems like the frame and slide are way better equipped to deal with some battering at the rear of slide travel than those barrel lugs are to deal with it at the front end.  Further, a reliable 1911 runs it's slide at a velocity that allows different things to happen....Run it too fast and you get three point jams.  This is even more likely with a ramped barrel that moves forward and up early in the feed cycle as the nose of the round impacts the feed ramp.

So, if we want to dump some of the momentum from the much higher impulse 1911 round (about double the energy of a typical 45 ACP load) what are the options beside a heavier recoil spring?

First, flat bottom firing pin stop.  Cocking the hammer is a first class lever relationship.  The hammer pin is the fulcrum, the mainspring is the load and the slide (or thumb) is the effort.  The closer to the fulcrum you apply the effect, the less reduction in force.  A flat bottom firing pin stop moves the effort about twice as close to the fulcrum as a standard tapered stop.  This means a bunch of momentum gets eaten up in increased effort to compress the mainspring.  And that momentum is not stored in such a way that it comes back later when we don't really want it.

Second, adding a couple lbs to the mainspring will give you more reliable hammer strikes, give you even more force to overcome in rearward slide travel, and only has the penalty of an oz or two in trigger pull weight.  A flat bottom firing pin stop and a 25 lb mainspring combined with a 19 lb recoil spring will give you a slide velocity very similar to a 45 ACP during recoil (compression).

As far as the rest of the gun, leave it alone.  It will be fine.

10
Gunsmithing / Re: Kensight adjustable install on EAA Hunter
« on: January 15, 2018, 08:08:06 AM »
Looks good.

Installing sights is always fun:

File, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit, file, fit.....finally! :P

11
10mm semi-auto handguns / Re: Upgraded my SR1911 this week
« on: January 15, 2018, 07:52:35 AM »
Forrest isn't suggesting you converted a 45 to 10mm.  He is saying that from the factory the SR1911-10mm has mostly the same springs as the 45 ACP.

Whoops, made a name error. I changed the sear spring, not the main spring.

Why did you change the sear spring?  And for a heavier one?  A heavier sear spring would be the wrong direction as it would just make the trigger pull heavier with no benefit.

I think you did mean the mainspring (aka hammer spring).

Personally, I think the ideal set-up is a flat bottom firing pin stop, a 25 lb main spring and a 22 lb recoil spring.  But, opinions....

12
10mm Hunting / Re: Hard Cast vs JHP for hogs
« on: January 15, 2018, 07:42:38 AM »
I would choose a good traditional hard cast with a WFN like Ramjet mentions.

By "traditional hard cast" I mean something in the 14-16 bhn range air-cooled, not water quenched wheel weights that are 20+ bhn.  Those harder quenched bullets are too brittle IMHO.  Great for shooting steel targets or punching paper.  Less so for hunting as they may (repeat may) shatter rather than punch through with a little expansion.

If you cast your own, start with clip on wheel weight or similar alloy and add about 1% tin.  Should air cool to about 14 BHN and will be plenty malleable.

If you are going to purchase cast bullets this becomes a bit harder.  There are lots of factors to consider and they are not particularly well qualified. 

13
Reloading 10mm ammo / Re: 180 grain Longshot loads
« on: January 12, 2018, 07:45:13 AM »
Here are the steps I use to set up a seat/crimp die the very first time.  As a note, I do this with an un-primed/charged case so that when I am done I have a dummy round I can put in the box with the dies to facilitate future die setup.

--First we need a bullet of the right COAL, with no crimp
1.  Install the shell holder, put a case in the shell holder, put a bullet on the top and raise the ram (no die installed)
2.  Remove the seating stem from the die (pistol) or raise it all the way (rifle)
3.  Screw the die body in until it just touches the case, then back out 1/8 turn
4.  Install and screw in the seating stem until it is finger tight against the bullet
5.  Lower the ram, check COAL, adjust the seating stem down if needed and raise the ram
6.  Repeat step five in appropriate increments until you reach your COAL

--Now we need to adjust crimp without changing the COAL
7.  Once the desired COAL is reach, screw the seating stem all the way up/out
8.  Raise the ram, screw the die body in until it touches the case, lower the ram and add 1/8 turn, raise the ram
9.  Lower the ram and check crimp, repeat adding 1/8 turn until the desired crimp is reached
10.  Lock the die body in place with the lock ring*
11.  With the dummy/first round in the shell holder and the ram raised, screw the seating stem down until it is hard finger tight against the bullet, lower the ram and add just a tiny bit more
12.  Lock the seating stem in place if the die supports such a lock

*I just keep a couple packages of the Horndady lock rings around for anything I want really locked.  I find they work the best.

As I mentioned above, I keep dummy cartridges for each bullet/coal in the die box.  This allows me to just put the dummy case in teh shell holder, raise the ram, screw the die body in until it touches the case + 1/8 turn, and then screw in the seating stem until it touches the bullet plus just a bit.  If you only load one bullet design/coal on one press then just set it up, lock it down and forget it.

Perhaps you already had seen or figured out theses steps.  If so, I am sure some other person learning reloading will stumble into this someday.

14
They dinked the GLOCK for having trouble with the slide release, but GLOCK’s have a slide lock and have never recommended using the slide lock to chamber a round.

Like I say, it was pretty clearly an competition with criteria meant to show how the 1911 is best, no matter what.

15
Clearly scored by people who favor a 1911.

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