Author Topic: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?  (Read 1808 times)

Ridgerunner665

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2017, 12:40:20 PM »

Since I have what might be the deer of my lifetime in my sights, so to speak, I've decided to pull out all the stops...

https://cuttingedgebullets.com/40-190gr-handgun-solid

Should drive through a deer from any angle, all of the benefits and none of the headaches of cast bullets.

Ridgerunner665

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2017, 12:42:45 PM »
Don't get many chances at a deer like this without paying big money for it...

I don't want to take any chances...


Ridgerunner665

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2017, 08:30:13 PM »
New picture...


TonyRumore

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2017, 07:54:46 AM »
My longest shot (250 pound hog) was at 85 yards with an iron-sighted 8.5" 41 Auto Mag.  The gun was hand-held and I was standing.  It was also cold and raining, but I still managed to shoot him right between the eyes with the first shot.  I imagine a 10mm would have worked as well, but I personally would need a long sight radius to pull it off at that distance.

Tony


G_man

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2017, 08:58:19 AM »
At what ranges, and conditions, do you routinely practice??? Beyond that is too far.

With my single actions I sight in at 50 yards and shoot out to 75. Beyond 75 is too far for me, with those handguns. We'll see what happens when I get my grock 40.....

Please elaborate for me on the problems with cast bullets. They're all I use in my hunting handguns with excellent results, both internally and externally. All copper bullets, in my limited experience with rifles, have their own set of problems.
Keep your booger hook off the boom switch until you're ready to fire

FN in MT

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2017, 06:40:44 PM »
 Deer are not tough to kill. I've killed a mess of them with handguns over the years. With three mature elk* and a few antelope thrown in as well.     (* Taken with a .454 Casull)

 I keep shots to what I'd call old time, traditional bow range if possible. Meaning 25 yds or less. I'd keep shots to whatever distance YOU can keep all shots CONSISTENTLY into an 8 or 10 inch plate.
If that's 25 yds....Then that's your max range.

 As far as WHERE....the heart/lung area is big and a good hit to either organ is a sure killer. Stay away from head shots as it's too risky. I've seen elk and deer with jaws shot off, etc. A cruel, lingering death that no animal deserves.

 Bullets.  I have zero input as to the 10mm. Closest to the ten would be the few deer and an antelope I took with a 6" .41 magnum and 220 gr, Keith SWC slugs.  The vast majority of my deer were killed with the .44 Spcl/.44 Mag , again, with Keith style SWC's.

 



 

Forrest

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Re: Range, how far is too far with a pistol?
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2017, 10:18:23 PM »
Since all the finer aspects of ballistics and energy have been discussed, let's consider something else. You mentioned that you'd like to kill the deer. Quickly and humanely. You're just not certain what maximum range you can do that at.

Personally, I don't care about the one shot kill. I believe that more people have lost game to the failed one shot kill than anything else. It's spectacular, romantic, and makes for good stories. It's also a great way to starve to death and lose game. You're essentially programming yourself for an all or nothing attempt without the consideration of anything but perfection. Train for the screw ups, failures, malfunctions and aww shucks. So let's trash that idea and let's examine the buckshot shotgunner tactic of shoot, close distance and shoot again.

Go with the idea that you are going to put lead on target until the deer stops, falls down and remains down all the while closing the distance and improving the accuracy percentage, energy on target and good vantage point of the target. I cannot stress enough that you must never move into an area where you lose your sight line on wounded game. Move laterally as you advance or stand and deliver from fifty yards rather than moving to thirty yards through a ravine or creek where you lose sight for any length of time. Be prepared and committed to multiple hits. Three or maybe even five hits.

How rapidly you can deliver the second and third shot at given range should dictate your maximum range of engagement. So how do you figure this out? It's pretty easy if you have a shot timer, but most of us aren't competitive shooters and we don't have this equipment. You can download an app for your phone. Set the split time goal time at one second. See how many hits you can get on a paper plate at a given distance with 1 second between shots. Increase the distance from ten yards on out to wherever you can no longer get two shots off one second apart for successful hits. Now you really need to practice getting successful hits off at a half second between shots with the ideal being around a quarter of a second shot to shot splits.  Assuming that a deer can run 40 mph, that works out to nearly 60 ft/sec, so the more rapidly you can make your second hit the less distance the deer will have traveled. Obviously, a wounded deer is not likely traveling at full speed, but if we can prepare for the worst, we can expect the best from ourselves.

Once you have found your maximum range, place paper plates five feet, ten and fifteen feet to the right and left of your target. Practice shooting the first target and then the second shot and third shots on the various targets to the right or left to simulate a wounded deer going away laterally. You can also simulate this with the side plates further away or closer. The idea is to get you used to the fact that the deer may not be in the position of the first shot by the time you are recovered from the recoil and ready for your follow-up shot or that your follow-up shot may be delayed/deferred due to brush or trees being in the way.  I'm a big fan of walking around randomly and then coming to a pause as if I had seen a deer or heard something and raising the gun and firing from a spot not exactly square to the targets, maybe on uneven ground, or from a half turned about position. Don't favor one side or the other. We can't choose that on the hunt. I like to shoot a shot or two and then rapidly close shoot again, and then close some more for any more shots.

Hopefully this has gotten you thinking more like a committed killer of game and the preparedness to make the kill and see it through. I think you've got enough gun. Time to get to know it and yourself a little better. When you get to the point where the shot sequence is almost automatic, you will be ready.